Read Apex Magazine Issue 63 by Sigrid Ellis Foz Meadows Amanda Forrest John Moran Erik Amundsen Nene Ormes Bogi Takács Alvaro Zinos-Amaro Online

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Apex Magazine is a monthly science fiction, fantasy, and horror magazine featuring original, mind-bending short fiction from many of the top pros of the field. New issues are released on the first Tuesday of every month.Edited by Hugo Award-nominated editor Sigrid Ellis.Table of ContentsFiction“Ten Days' Grace” by Foz Meadows“Sister of Mercy” by Amanda E. Forrest“The SandbApex Magazine is a monthly science fiction, fantasy, and horror magazine featuring original, mind-bending short fiction from many of the top pros of the field. New issues are released on the first Tuesday of every month.Edited by Hugo Award-nominated editor Sigrid Ellis.Table of ContentsFiction“Ten Days' Grace” by Foz Meadows“Sister of Mercy” by Amanda E. Forrest“The Sandbirds of Mirelle” by John Moran“Jupiter and Gentian” by Erik Amundsen“The Matter” by Nene Ormes (eBook/subscriber exclusive)“Zombies & Calculus — Excerpt” by Colin Adams (eBook/subscriber exclusive)Poetry“A User Guide to the Application of Gem-Flowers” by Bogi Takacs“Conservation of Energy” by Alvaro Zinos-AmaroNonfiction“Resolute: Notes from the Editor-in-Chief” by Sigrid Ellis“The Testosterone Injection That Could Ruin Orphan Black...And How to Make Sure it Doesn't” by Duane de Four“Apex Author Interview with John Moran” by Andrea Johnson“Apex Cover Artist Interview with Cyril Rolando” by Loraine Sammy“Clavis Aurea: A Review of Short Fiction” by Charlotte AshleyCover art by Cyril Rolando....

Title : Apex Magazine Issue 63
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781311700674
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 177 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Apex Magazine Issue 63 Reviews

  • Erin (PT)
    2019-02-27 00:31

    This issue started out great. I really, deeply loved "Ten Days' Grace" by Foz Meadows, with its The Handmaid's Tale-like plausible dystopia, and Amanda Forrest's "Sister of Mercy". Duane de Four's essay on Orphan Black didn't light any new fires for me, but I love the show and I share de Four's concerns about its future direction. I'm usually a little nonplussed by poetry, but I enjoyed this issue's offerings.I felt like Charlotte Ashley's "Clavis Aurea: A Review of Short Fiction" was less effective unless you're already familiar with the works she was talking about--which I was not--so it didn't do much for me, and the excerpt from "Zombies and Calculus" by Colin Adams was okay, but I find myself disinterested in stories where the main characters seem to have zero awareness of the pop culture references you'd expect just from being alive in their culture--as this one did. Also, I'm not a math geek. So, not my favorite, though that's very personal.I enjoyed "The Sandbirds of Mirelle", but it seemed a little simple and facile. Somewhat similarly, I wanted more from "The Good Matter", though I found it's ideas cool and intriguing. I didn't like Erik Amundsen's "Jupiter and Gentian" at all. I actually would've finished the issue a week sooner if I hadn't dragged my heels over this story, but I just couldn't get through it for the longest time and I only finally finished it to say that I did. So overall, the great promise of the first stories didn't deliver (for me) all the way through to the end, but it was still a great overall issue and well worth reading.

  • Lisa
    2019-02-22 04:28

    I found myself being really picky about the features in this month’s issue that I wanted to talk about here, but the ones I did take notes on are truly excellent pieces, both fiction and nonfiction. To start, let’s take the nonfiction. Duane de Four’s essay, “The Testosterone Injection That Could Ruin Orphan Black…”, is a thoughtful look at everything the show is doing right, and everything that it might now be on the edge of doing wrong – but rather than wringing hands and wailing, it’s taking a hopeful view, balancing the worry with a fair look at the potential for what it could still achieve, even with the direction it looks to be going in. Heads up, also – if you intend to read this, it does contain spoilers! (That said, for what it’s worth I found the spoilery bits more intriguing than annoying. I’m more eager to get caught up now, and find out what’s what!)As for the fiction, I’ve got a couple of standout pieces I love from this month’s selection. “Conservation of Energy”, a poem by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro, is now on the very (very) short list of works of fiction that have earned a “holy crap” from me. The poem looks at how we can often deal with grief by embracing rage, even rage at ourselves, and how both emotions can affect how we see the world. This one hit me right in the heart. It may be uncomfortable to admit, but when something rings so true the admittance is really unavoidable. So it’s a little frightening, but this is one hell of a stunning piece of poetry. Read it and see.*Deep breath* Okay. On to what I am already pretty damn certain is going to be one of my absolute favourite, standout short stories this year – “The Sandbirds of Mirelle” by John Moran. The subject matter of defining moments in life is approached in a wonderfully subtle, thoughtful manner, one that balances the beauty and/or the importance of such moments with the starker reality that, on the other hand, such things happen all the time… I won’t get too specific about the moments in question because you really need to read this one, and so I encourage you to do this, instead. This is just a beautifully written story, and one that I’m all but certain is going to stay with me. (You can also read an excellent interview with John Moran in this issue, courtesy of Andrea Johnson, which has only contributed to my appreciation of it – I had thoughts! They weren’t wrong!)I may not want to give away spoilers here, but I would like leave you with a quote that pretty neatly captures the moment I felt like I ‘got it':“I can’t believe how many rocks there are in the desert,” I said.He shrugged. “Rocks aren’t interesting.”“It reminds me of what my astronomy teacher once said: wherever you look, there’s stars.”“And what did you learn from that?”“That it’s very hard to be special.”

  • Amber
    2019-02-27 03:48

    Nothing that really jumped out to me in this issue but still some very well written stories and some interesting sci-fi ideas brought up and explored. The piece in the back about the show Orphan Black and the implications the last episode might have for the next season was interesting, thought provoking, and quite a surprise to see included. Not that I'm complaining. I greatly enjoyed reading it.

  • Tammy
    2019-03-21 04:46

    I am fascinated by Cyril Rolando's cover art. The light on the eye!There wasn't much I didn't like about this issue. Great, great stuff. I particularly enjoyed "Ten Days' Grace" by Foz Meadows and "Sister of Mercy" by Amanda Forrest. I'm also very intrigued by the novel excerpt from Zombies & Calculus which is, strangely and wonderfully enough, a novel about zombies and math.